University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

ITAL Courses 2141

0001 Elementary Italian 1   5 cr.
10129 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Righi, Sabrina 
10131 AT MoTuWeThFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00G18 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 McCord, Jenny 
11941 AT MoTuWeThFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00219 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Marsh, Danielle 
12326 AT MoTuWeThFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 00236 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Sagasta, Alice 
21570 SE3 MoWe 06:00 PM-08:05 PM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Veroni, Chiara 

This is the first of a three-term sequence that is an introduction to the Italian language, including basic grammar, vocabulary and speech patterns. The primary goal is to achieve competency in the spoken language, along with basic skills in reading and writing. Instructors incorporate a variety of texts (written, audio-visual, etc.) to present contemporary Italian culture. Students' progress is evaluated through oral and written exams, homework assignments, participation in class, and portfolio assignments.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0002 Elementary Italian 2 L    5 cr.
11545 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00206 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Hertz, Angela 
21571 AT MoTuWeThFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 00G18 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Hertz, Hertz 

This is the second of a three-term sequence that aims to build upon the grammatical, linguistic and cultural structures in Italian 0001, while expanding students' knowledge of basic Italian language and culture. The primary goal is to achieve competency in the spoken language, along with basic skills in reading and writing. Instructors incorporate a variety of texts (written, audio-visual, etc.) to present contemporary Italian culture. Students' progress is evaluated through oral and written exams, homework assignments, participation in class, and portfolio assignments.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0001 (MIN GRADE 'C-')

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0003 Intermediate Italian 1 REG   3 cr.
10132 AT MoWeFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 0244A CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Denman, Lorraine 
12240 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00411 IS     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 McCord, Jenny 
18458 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 0208A CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Denman, Lorraine 

This is the third of a three-term sequence that aims to develop skills and areas of competence acquired in ITAL 0001 and 0002, while teaching students to produce more authentic and more accurate Italian speech, comprehend more sophisticated structures in written and oral form, and broaden their understanding of contemporary Italian culture and society. Instructors incorporate a variety of texts (authentic written materials, songs, film, short stories) to present contemporary Italian culture. Students' progress is evaluated through oral and written exams, homework assignments, participation in class, and portfolio assignments.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0002 (MIN GRADE 'C-')

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0004 Intermediate Italian 2 REG   3 cr.
10792 AT MoWeFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00G18 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Cleaver, Natalie 

This course aims to continue students' development in all aspects of the Italian language, with particular emphasis on those skills and tools necessary for advanced literacy in written Italian. Students in this course will encounter, discuss, interpret, and analyze articles, songs, video, films, literary excerpts, and other authentic texts, leading to both a greater understanding of contemporary Italian culture and a greater mastery of Italian forms, vocabulary, and expressions. Special attention will be paid to vocabulary-building exercises, strategies for the focused and efficient reading of texts, and carrying out different kinds of reading for different purposes. At the same time, students will continue to develop their oral proficiency in Italian by discussing and analyzing broad contemporary topics, as they emerge from the course's assigned readings. This class is conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0003 (MIN GRADE 'C-')

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0003 (MIN GRADE

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0061 Literary Italian 2 W  3 cr.
27512 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 0G16B CL Women in Culture WRIT   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Savoia, Francesca 

The course deals with the representation of women and the idea of the feminine in the works of some male Italian writers, as well as with the contribution of some Italian women writers to Italian literature and culture. The presence of women in the history of Italian culture will be examined in the contexts of narrative fiction, poetry, theater and film. The readings selected (poems, short stories and plays) will present the students with a variety of concrete examples of written literary Italian and, in combination with the film or films, will offer the opportunity for discussion of many different issues related to the central theme. In addition to regular assignments, aimed at reviewing some of the most difficult points of Italian grammar and syntax, students will be asked to complete a series of short 1-2 page papers, mostly critical responses to assigned reading/viewing, but also detailed summaries or descriptions, and brief creative-writing projects. This course is one of three possible courses that satisfy the fifth semester requirement (either 0060W or 0061W or 1041W) for majors both in the traditional Italian track and the Italian Studies track; it is conducted entirely in Italian and satisfies the School of Arts & Sciences “W” requirement. Prerequisite: Italian 0004 with B- or better. Class Capacity: 15 Students

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0004 (MIN GRADE

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0080 Italian Cultural Heritage 1 REG   3 cr.
22772 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00154 CHVRN     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 80 Looney,Dennis O 

The literature, art, and social and political life of Medieval and Renaissance Italy had a profound effect on Western culture in the centuries that followed. In this course we will read, in English, excerpts from the works of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, as well as works of important minor authors (e.g., St. Francis, Frederick II, poets of the Sweet New Style, and St. Catherine). We will consider the transition between the Medieval and Renaissance periods, focusing on how people lived, worked and thought in the 13th - 15th centuries. No prerequisites. No knowledge of Italian is required. The course satisfies the Foreign Culture Requirement.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1068 Italian Novella   3 cr.
27511 AT TuTh 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 01325 CL The Short Story in Italy   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Insana, Lina 

What are the conventions of short fiction and how do they evolve over time? What is the relationship between the story and the collection? Do short stories act as sketchbooks for writers’ larger (novelistic) projects? How might the Italian tradition differ from other national contexts (German, English, American, French)? Does the short story have a unique relationship to place or region? Does it have a unique relationship to orality, to storytelling, to certain languages (or dialects)? The Italian short story tradition is a long and important one; many trace the origins of the entire short story genre to Boccaccio’s Decameron. We will begin this class with one of Boccaccio’s sources, and then look at Boccaccio’s fundamental example of a collection that exceeds the sum of its pieces. We will then move to the Renaissance and examine the stories that make up the Italian “Romeo and Juliet” tradition that so inspired Shakespeare, as well as a short story written by Nicolò Machiavelli. From there we will pass to the post-Unification short story and will spend the last part of the course exploring the way(s) that post-WWII Italian writers see the relationship between the single story and the collection as a whole. In this context we will read selections from: Verga’s Novelle rusticane, Pirandello’s Novelle per un anno (and watch the Taviani Brothers’ adaptation of these stories in Kaos), Calvino’s Città invisibili, Levi’s Storie naturali, and Celati’s Narratori delle pianure. This class is taught entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: B- or better in ITAL 0060, 0061, or 1041

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0060 or 0061 or 1041

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1086 Italian Theater In English LIT    3 cr.
27509 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00236 CL Theater in Translation   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Savoia, Francesca 

Italy has a long and firmly rooted tradition of both popular and erudite theater. Although this course is mostly devoted to the theater of the last century, it also wants to convey to students the idea of how important drama has been throughout Italy’s cultural history. In the first few weeks of class, we will pay close attention to the features of Commedia dell’Arte, a form of theater born in the middle of the Sixteenth century at the time of the rise of professional actors and actresses. While this form of theater was most successful between the late 1500s and the mid 1700s, its influence was felt far beyond Italy and far beyond those centuries, and its practices endure to this day. We will study the work of playwrights Luigi Pirandello, Eduardo De Filippo, Dario Fo and Franca Rame as heirs of that tradition, and as eminent theorists and practitioners of the Italian stage in the 20th-century. No prerequisites. No knowledge of Italian is required. The course satisfies the 1st Literature Requirement. Class capacity: 25 Students

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1902 Directed Study   1 to 4 cr.
19974 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Savoia, Francesca 

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1903 Honrs Dir Research: Ital Majs   1 to 3 cr.
10133 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Savoia,Francesca 

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1905 Internship In Italian   1 to 6 cr.
11233 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Savoia,Francesca 

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2801 History Of Italian Language   3 cr.
27507 AT  02:30 PM-04:55 PM 01325 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 12 Looney, Dennis 

The course is organized around the central problem that has persisted throughout the history of the language, the so-called “questione della lingua,” or the question of which, if any, of its many co-existing forms is the true or correct or in some way the preferable form of Italian. Beginning with its origins in Latin, we will consider how Italian has changed over the course of centuries and how the relationship between dialects and the standard language has developed. Emphasis will be given to the various arguments that have been advanced from Dante’s time to the present to defend particular forms of Italian as the “best” model for writing and, to a lesser degree, for speech. Authors considered include Dante, Alberti, Machiavelli, Bembo, Salviati (Crusca), Galileo, Cesarotti, Manzoni, and Pasolini, among others. We will read from many primary documents, some complete and many in excerpted form, as well as from a significant amount of secondary criticism by, among others, F. Bruni, T. De Mauro, C. Dionisotti, G. Lepeschy, C. Marazzini, and B. Migliorini. Main text: Claudio Marazzini, La lingua italiana. Profilo storico (3a edizione, Bologna: Il Mulino, 2002). Evaluations: oral presentations and assignments 40%, take-home midterm exam 30%, take-home final examination 30%.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2902 Directed Study   1 to 3 cr.
10134 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Insana,Lina  

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2910 Comprehensive Examination Ma   1 to 3 cr.
10135 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 3 Insana,Lina  

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2970 Teaching Of Italian   3 cr.
10136 AT Mo 02:00 PM-04:25 PM 00G26 BENDM     No recitation. Combined w/ FR 2970 SPAN 2307 FR 2975  Enroll Limit 3 Donato,Richard 

Teaching French, Italian, and German [for beginning TAs] /Advanced Topics in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching [for advanced TAs] This course supports the concept that instructional expertise is developed in and through teaching. Using a modified "lesson study model" of teacher development, new and experienced foreign language instructors will work together to identify problems of practice, discuss the theory and instructional practices that address these pedagogical concerns, and collaboratively develop a lesson to be taught by a member of the class and later analyzed and refined by the class as a whole. Videotapes of these lessons will be used as the primary source of information for analysis, discussion, and reflection. Four major areas will ground our work: 1) designing lessons to promote a language learning community, 2) teaching culture through language, and language through culture, 3) advancing oral language proficiency, and 4) developing literacy in a foreign language. Assignments include participation in collaborative lesson plan development, reflective reports on videotapes of classroom instruction, written analysis of tutorial work with language learners, and a culminating project developed in stages throughout the course that unifies the four themes in a statement of teaching philosophy. Not language specific, this course is intended for current and future teachers in the modern foreign languages.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2990 Independent Study   1 to 3 cr.
10137 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Insana,Lina N 

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

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