University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

FR Courses 2144

0001 Elementary French 1   5 cr.
10502 AT MoTuWeThFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00237 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Riser, Thomas 
10503 AT MoTuWeThFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00219 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Rizk, Dahlia 
16925 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 0244B CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Boyer, Gabriel 

This five-hour-per-week course introduces students to the French language, and is designed to develop both linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in both spoken and written French. Because the focus is on task-centered communication, the class is conducted entirely in the target language. Course objectives for Elementary French 0001 are: a) to speak French well enough to describe, narrate and ask simple questions in the present about a variety of everyday topics such as family, work, eating and traveling; b) to understand French well enough to grasp main ideas in short conversations about everyday topics; c) to understand simple written French well enough to grasp main ideas; d) to write sentences and short paragraphs on everyday topics; f) to develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures; f) to understand, at a very basic level, how French functions as a language. This course is for students with little or no previous exposure to the language and its cultures. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0002 Elementary French 2   5 cr.
10504 AT MoTuWeThFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00229 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Dimitrova, Anna 
11646 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00230 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Grove, Sylvia 
21719 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00237 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Demuynck, Alice 
11050 SE3 MoWe 06:00 PM-08:05 PM 00216 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Ertunga, Mert 

As a continuation of French 0001, this five-hour-per-week course (re)introduces students to the French language, building on skills gained in French 1. Culturally-contextualized comprehension and production abilities in both written and spoken form are stressed. Because the focus is on communication, French 0002 is taught entirely in the target language. Objectives for Elementary French 0002 are: to speak French well enough to ask for and give autobiographical information (names, ages, birthdates, places of origin, occupation); to talk about friends and family and one’s immediate environment; to talk about likes and dislikes (food, preferences, sports, leisure time); to talk about university life (courses, daily schedule, current residence). By the end of the course, students should be able to identify the main ideas, purpose and some supporting details of uncomplicated authentic target-language texts with clear underlying structures that describe everyday activities of a personal and/or social nature, i.e., travel brochures, schedules, menus, advertisements, maps and signs, popular press articles, etc. Students in French 0002 continue to develop a deeper understanding of the cultural products, practices and perspectives of French-speaking lands and how French works as a language. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0003 Intermediate French 1   3 cr.
10506 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00306 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Boum Make, Jennifer 
10816 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00202 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Boum Make, Jennifer 

This intermediate, three hour-per-week course builds on the skills acquired during the first year of study in French 1 and 2, while further developing linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in French. Because the focus is on communication, the course is taught entirely in the target language. Course objectives for French 3 are as follows: 1) speak French well enough to ask and answer questions in various situations beyond what is needed to simply "survive" in a francophone culture, i.e., the ability to talk about self and surroundings in some detail; 2) understand enough spoken French to grasp main ideas and some supporting details in short conversations related to topics above; 3) read well enough to understand principal themes and most details in simple literary and non-literary texts; 4) write longer and more cohesive paragraphs; 5) cultivate a deeper understanding of French-speaking cultures; 6) gain a better understanding of how French works as a language

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0004 Intermediate French 2   3 cr.
11897 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00219 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Mateos, Maeva 
22320 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00242 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Mateos, Maeva 
16926 SE3 MoWe 06:00 PM-07:15 PM 00227 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Cartwright, Jerry 

As a continuation of French 0003, this three-hour-per-week course builds on the linguistic and sociolinguistic skills acquired in French 0003. The focus is on communication and instruction is entirely in the target language. Course objectives for French 0004 are as follows: 1) speak French well enough to ask and answer questions in various situations beyond what is needed to simply “get along” in a francophone culture, i.e., the ability to talk about oneself and describe surroundings with a bit of detail; 2) understand enough spoken French to grasp main ideas and supporting details in short conversations related to topics above; 3) read well enough to understand principal themes and most details in simple literary and non-literary texts; 4) write longer and more cohesive paragraphs; 5) cultivate a deeper understanding of French-speaking cultures; 6) gain a better understanding of how French works as a language. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0020 France In The 21st Century REG   3 cr.
11476 AT MoWeFr 09:00 AM-09:50 AM 00306 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Monserrat, Delphine 

This course is designed to lead students to a better understanding of France today. We pay particular attention to different forms of identity in France: national, religious, regional, ethnic. Wherever feasible, class discussion will center on primary documents (newspapers, magazines, films, cartoons, public opinion polls, etc.). The format is a combination of lectures and discussions. French is the language of instruction and of students' written work.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0021 or 0027 or 0055 or 0056 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0021 Apprches To French Literature LIT    3 cr.
20682 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00202 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 23 Hogg, Chloe 

The purpose of this course is to illustrate ways of looking at literary texts. We shall examine poems, prose works and plays from France and the francophone world, trying to answer some of the following questions: What are the characteristics of these different genres? What is specifically literary in the text? How can reading such a text make us more able to understand today's world? Considering these questions should make students more familiar with French-language literary production and also help them understand the literary phenomenon in general.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0027 or 0055 or 0056 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0027 The French Atlantic HS  REG   3 cr.
16927 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 0208A CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Doshi, Neil 

In this course we will explore the encounter between Europeans, Africans and Americans in the New World. The course is designed to give students a historical perspective on the French presence in the Americas, with a particular emphasis on the period that ranges from the early 16th century to the early 19th century. The course is taught entirely in French. Our goal is to encourage students to read, contextualize and understand important documents in the original language, while promoting development of their written and oral expression in order to more effectively communicate that understanding. The French Atlantic fulfills the General Education Requirement for a course in historical change.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0021 or 0055 or 0056 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0055 French Conversation   3 cr.
10507 AT TuTh 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 00202 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Ganster, Anne 
11195 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Wells, Brett 

In this course students will continue to develop oral proficiency in French through engaging in conversation, providing and obtaining information, and exchanging opinions. Students present informally during debates and sketches as well as more formally through oral exposes and digitally recorded oral samples. Understanding of the cultural implications of written and visual texts is enhanced through exposure to current news stories and films.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0021 or 0027 or 0056 (MIN GRADE: 'C' for all listed Courses)

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0056 Written French 1   3 cr.
17658 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00227 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Hogg, Chloe 

The course is designed to promote the development of writing skills through a writing-as-process approach. Class work and written assignments will include journal writing, grammar review, vocabulary development, and analysis of model texts. Based on close work with models, students will then craft substantial compositions, each illustrating a function (narration, description) or a genre (essay, film review). Attention will be given to helping students improve as writers by learning to analyze, edit, and revise their own work. Course taught in French.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0021 or 0027 or 0055 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0058 Advanced French Conversation   1 cr.
10509 AT MoWe 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00349 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Bock, Amanda 

This one-unit class at once builds on and complements French 55. It is designed to improve students’ oral proficiency and sociolinguistic competence through contextualized simulated immersion. The course is divided into four sections, each demanding different, but complementary social and linguistic skills, to wit 1) getting to know people and places; 2) current events; 3) debate and disagreement; 4) cultural comparisons. Emphasis is on acquiring the authentic oral communication skills, in the widest sense of the term, necessary to navigate expertly French-speaking environments.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0055

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0080 Modern French Novel LIT  W  3 cr.
21721 AT MoWeFr 02:00 PM-02:50 PM 00227 CL   WRIT   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Ryder, Andrew 

This course introduces students to some of the novels that have shaped the modern French literary sensibility and show how the French novel has evolved from the 19th-century novelist Guy de Maupassant to the modern writers Albert Camus and Marguerite Duras. From social climbers and expatriate lovers of exoticism in the late 19th-century and early 20th-century to those people who experienced the trauma of the German Occupation of France in 1940 and the Holocaust, we will encounter characters who struggled to survive and to define themselves in often difficult circumstances. We will read six novels in English translation. Our goal is not only a better comprehension of literary texts but also an exploration of different ways of reading and writing about complex novels. This course fulfills the Writing Requirement toward the French major and the LIT general education requirement. It does not count as a credit requirement for the French major. This course will be taught in English.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0080 Modern French Novel LIT  W  3 cr.
29511 AT MoWeFr 02:00 PM-02:50 PM 00204 CL   WRIT   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Tomkowicz,Paulina 

This course introduces students to some of the novels that have shaped the modern French literary sensibility and show how the French novel has evolved from the 19th-century novelist Guy de Maupassant to the modern writers Albert Camus and Marguerite Duras. From social climbers and expatriate lovers of exoticism in the late 19th-century and early 20th-century to those people who experienced the trauma of the German Occupation of France in 1940 and the Holocaust, we will encounter characters who struggled to survive and to define themselves in often difficult circumstances. We will read six novels in English translation. Our goal is not only a better comprehension of literary texts but also an exploration of different ways of reading and writing about complex novels. This course fulfills the Writing Requirement toward the French major and the LIT general education requirement. It does not count as a credit requirement for the French major. This course will be taught in English.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1001 Poetry   3 cr.
29308 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00242 CL Middle Ages to the Present   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Kosinski, Renate 

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Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1016 19th Century Topics   3 cr.
27822 AT TuTh 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 00306 CL Romantic Passions   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

The first half of the 19th is a momentous era in French culture: literature and the arts responded to the powerful challenge of political revolution and technological innovation. A new sense of interiority emerged from the feeling of being violated and pushed forward by historical forces. The French Romantics elaborated a new esthetics founded on passions, both personal and political. In this class we will analyze poems, short stories, one novel and several paintings and musical pieces created in France between 1800 and 1850, by writers and artists such as Victor Hugo, Germaine de Staël, Stendhal, Baudelaire, Delacroix, Chopin and Berlioz. The students will gain a new appreciation for the Romantic movement, and interrogate the relevance of its creations to contemporary society. The class will be conducted in French.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1052 Spec Topics In Fr Civilization   3 cr.
25714 AT We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00304 CL French Global   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Walsh, John III 

This course frames questions about French and francophone literature, culture and film in a global context to ask, how can one be French and global? We will investigate spaces, objects, environments, and texts (including their readers/viewers and histories) that allow us to think about articulations of, and connections between, France and the world in different transcultural, literary, and historical contexts. The course materials cover the Middles Ages to the contemporary period and include literary texts, historical documents, film, visual culture, critical readings, and online sources. Students will hone their skills of literary and cultural analysis as they explore a global perspective on French and francophone studies. Coursework and discussions are in French, enabling students to develop and refine their linguistic skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) throughout the seminar.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1902 Directed Study   1 to 3 cr.
17337 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Wells, Brett 

Description not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1903 Honors Dir Research:Fr Majors   1 to 3 cr.
10511 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 3 Wells, Brett 

Description not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1905 Internship In French   1 to 6 cr.
11045 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Wells, Brett 

Description not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2510 French Romanticism   3 cr.
29287 AT Mo 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 0244B CL In-Fights: The French Romantics between Revolutions and Restorations   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

In terms of esthetic theory and practice, Romanticism is often considered the artistic counterpoint of the Age of Revolutions. The French Revolution and Bonapartism played a pivotal role in establishing the historical context for this movement, but, paradoxically, the reception of Romanticism as dominant sensibility and esthetic practice was delayed in France until the Restoration. Through the personal and intellectual mediation of transitional, exilic figures such as Chateaubriand, Constant and De Staël, British and Northern European trends were first received as “barbarous” and then carefully “Frenchified”, both in esthetical and political terms. What were the stakes of the adoption of a largely foreign Romantic esthetics and is related affective economy for the French writers active in the first half of the 19th Century? How is the solitude of the Romantic subject politicized in France during an extremely unstable period? Why and when did Romanticism start to appear obsolete to the first fully modern generation of French writers and artists? We will address these and other questions through the reading of several French romantic classics, both in the poetic and the novelistic repertoire. The works of De Staël, Chateaubriand, Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Sand, Nerval and Baudelaire will be read in dialogue with the esthetic theories of Schlegel, Novalis and Hegel and with the most current esthetic and critical debates about French Romantic esthetics. We will also address the role of operatic adaptations of foreign literary classics in France through the study of Hector Berlioz’ Faust, translated by Gérard de Nerval. The class will be conducted in French. The vast majority of the readings will be available in English translation. Graduate students from other programs will be allowed to write their final papers in English.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2765 Comparitive Francophone Culture   3 cr.
29288 AT Th 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 00329 CL Fictions of the Archipelago: Ecology, Culture, and Politics in the Francophone Caribbean Novel   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 12 Walsh, John 

From mangroves to rhizomes, rivers to the sea, mountains to the plateau, the natural world is a privileged site – a sacred topography – of Caribbean art in general and, more specifically, the francophone Caribbean novel of the 20th and 21st centuries. The goal of this seminar is to examine the ways that literature explores the relationship between human activity and the Caribbean environment. How do these novels inhabit this archipelago? How do they represent the complexity of natural forces, and what connections do they make between environmental diversity and forms of cultural and religious identity? Against the backdrop of the legacies of slavery and colonialism, we will investigate the imbrication of natural and cultural phenomena as depicted in canonical works, including Jacques Roumain’s Masters of the Dew (Gouverneurs de la rosée, 1944); Édouard Glissant’s The Ripening (La Lézarde, 1958); Marie Vieux-Chauvet’s Dance on the Volcano (La Danse sur le volcan, 1957); Maryse Condé’s Crossing the Mangrove (Traversée de la mangrove, 1992); Patrick Chamoiseau’s Texaco (1992); and Yanick Lahens’ Guillaume et Nathalie (2013). Moreover, as the earthquake that ravaged Haiti in January 2010 revealed with calamitous force, natural disaster is also a political crisis. Therefore, this seminar also aims to address how politics is thoroughly implicated in the Caribbean (literary) ecosystem. In the attempt to work through these questions, the course will engage the critical literature of the Caribbean trinity of Négritude, Antillanité, and Créolité. In addition to reading some of the major writers and journals associated with these movements, (including Aimé and Suzanne Césaire’s contributions to Tropiques; Glissant’s Caribbean Discourse; and Chamoiseau, Raphaël Confiant, and Jean Bernabé’s manifesto, In Praise of Creoleness), we will also study two less well known precursors in La Ronde and La Revue Indigène, as well as responses to the créolistes (beginning with Condé and Madeleine Cottenet-Hage’s Penser la créolité). The seminar’s approach to these texts is two-fold: to consider how they interrogate Caribbean environments on their own terms; and, to explore how they also work within, and contest, a number of critical theories from without (including Marxism, especially the conflict between race and class; the rhizomatic theory of Gilles Deleuze; and the relatively newer field of eco-criticism, or the relationship between literature and, as coined by Dana Phillips, “the truth of ecology”). Thus, on a theoretical level, the seminar seeks to understand the “nature” of representation at work in these novels, especially as much theory of the latter half of the 20th century has argued that nature is a cultural construction. The course will be taught in English. With the exception of Lahens’ Guillaume et Nathalie and a few secondary sources, all readings will be available in translation.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2902 Directed Study   1 to 12 cr.
10517 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Mecchia, Giuseppina 
19015 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

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Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2910 Comprehensive Examination Ma   1 to 3 cr.
10518 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

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Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2973 Issues In Foreign Language Ed   3 cr.
10519 AT Mo 04:30 PM-07:10 PM 05400 WWPH     No recitation. Combined w/ IL 2256      Enroll Limit 3  

This IL course is offered by the School of Education. (This database contains courses offered by the School of Arts and Sciences, the College of General Studies, the University Honors College, and some core courses in the Arts and Sciences/Business Dual Degree Program.) Prerequisite(s): none

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2990 Independent Study   1 to 12 cr.
10520 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 7 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Graduate students should consult with the DGS before registering for this course.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3000 Research And Dissertation Phd   1 to 15 cr.
10521 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 16 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Graduate students should consult with the DGS before registering for this course.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3902 Directed Study   1 to 12 cr.
10522 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5  

Description not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3905 Teaching Apprenticeship   1 to 12 cr.
10970 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

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Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3910 Comprehensive Examination   1 to 12 cr.
10523 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

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Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

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