University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

ITAL Courses 2144

0001 Elementary Italian 1   5 cr.
10022 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00229 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Mangravite, Gina Marie 
11049 AT MoTuWeThFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00227 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19  
11508 SE3 TuTh 06:00 PM-08:05 PM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Veronisauret, Chia 

This is the first of a three-term sequence that is an introduction to the Italian language, including basic grammar, vocabulary and speech patterns. The primary goal is to achieve competency in the spoken language, along with basic skills in reading and writing. Instructors incorporate a variety of texts (written, audio-visual, etc.) to present contemporary Italian culture. Students' progress is evaluated through oral and written exams, homework assignments, participation in class, and portfolio assignments.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0002 Elementary Italian 2   5 cr.
11647 AT MoTuWeThFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Marsh, Danielle Nicole 
12178 AT MoTuWeThFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Sagasta, Alice 
12179 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00227 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Righi, Sabrina 
11204 SE3 MoWe 06:00 PM-08:05 PM 00318 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 McCord, Jennifer Bliss 

This is the second of a three-term sequence that aims to build upon the grammatical, linguistic and cultural structures in Italian 0001, while expanding students' knowledge of basic Italian language and culture. The primary goal is to achieve competency in the spoken language, along with basic skills in reading and writing. Instructors incorporate a variety of texts (written, audio-visual, etc.) to present contemporary Italian culture. Students' progress is evaluated through oral and written exams, homework assignments, participation in class, and portfolio assignments.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0001 (MIN GRADE 'C-')

This course is offered every term.

0004 Intermediate Italian 2 REG   3 cr.
11507 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00G18 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Denman, Lorraine 
12004 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00G18 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Aloe, Andrea 

This course aims to continue students' development in all aspects of the Italian language, with particular emphasis on those skills and tools necessary for advanced literacy in written Italian. Students in this course will encounter, discuss, interpret, and analyze articles, songs, video, films, literary excerpts, and other authentic texts, leading to both a greater understanding of contemporary Italian culture and a greater mastery of Italian forms, vocabulary, and expressions. Special attention will be paid to vocabulary-building exercises, strategies for the focused and efficient reading of texts, and carrying out different kinds of reading for different purposes. At the same time, students will continue to develop their oral proficiency in Italian by discussing and analyzing broad contemporary topics, as they emerge from the course's assigned readings. This class is conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: ITAL 0003 (MIN GRADE 'C-')

This course is offered every term.

0081 Italian Cultural Heritage 2 REG   3 cr.
25735 AT MoWe 03:00 PM-04:15 PM 01500 WWPH     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 60 Savoia, Francesca 

Through the close reading of major Italian thinkers, storytellers, poets and artists, as well as scientists, historians and journalists, from the Renaissance to the post-war period, this course aims to make the student aware of the richness and complexity of the Italian cultural heritage, and of the great influence it has exerted on all of Western culture in virtually every age. The instructor will introduce students to the various periods which the course is intended to encompass, and illustrate the cultural movements and historical events which served as context to the works selected. This semester, the course will pay particular attention to the relationship between power and cultural production: through the focused study of representative texts and their contexts, students will thus have the opportunity to compare and contrast the power-culture relationships at play in various periods of Italian history. Audio-visual material will be used to complement readings and class discussion. No knowledge of Italian is required. No prerequisites. This course satisfies the Foreign Culture Requirement and may be applied to all Italian major tracks and both Italian major programs.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1032 Introduction To Italian Linguistics   3 cr.
29142 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00G18 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Denman, Loraine 

In this course students will describe, analyze and account for various linguistic phenomena found in Standard Italian in order to gain a better understanding of its internal structure and gain insight into how the language works. Emphasis will be placed on the following areas: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics (depending on student interest the following topics may be explored: history of the language, dialectical varieties of Italian and related languages, theories of second language acquisition). This course will be taught entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 0060, 0061, 1041 or permission of the instructor (contact denman@pitt.edu)

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: (ITAL 0060 or 0061 or 1041)

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1078 Fulbright Seminar In Italian Studies   3 cr.
29141 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00G18 CL Italian Government and Politicse   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Esu, Aide 

Italian politics is often defined as chaotic, paradoxical, and highly unstable. This course will provide a background to the understanding of a complex political system through an examination of history, culture, social transformation and media production. The course will be structured along three main themes: 1. The post-war period 2. The 1970s’ the new agenda 3. From the First to the Second Republic. The issue of justice is the underlying theme that binds together the three sections. Emphasis will be placed on the process of drafting the Italian Constitution, and on the inspiring ideals that animated the principles and rules it contains. The aim of the course is to guide students in a study of Italy from a political and sociological perspective. Some literary readings and movies will provide a broader national picture. Politics, society and culture are reflected in Italian cinema. The social cinema, neo-realism, Italian comedy, and more recently, political satire offer interesting and illustrative examples. No prerequisites. No knowledge of Italian is required.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1085 Dante, Petrarch, And Boccaccio LIT    3 cr.
27854 AT MoWe 04:30 PM-05:45 PM 00218 CL The Medieval Plagiarist: Imitation and Originality in the Middle Ages   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Cleaver, Natalie 

The Middle Ages understood writing as a creative act, but also as an act of imitation. The poet’s creation of a fictional world was considered to imitate God’s creation of the natural universe. But medieval poets did not stop at divine imitation. They also imitated the authoritative literary models that they inherited from the classical world, and they frequently imitated each other. This could take the form of adopting the same style, telling and retelling the same stories, continuing someone else’s tale, or possibly even “borrowing” a few lines or more straight from another poem. Today, this may seem like plagiarism or intellectual theft. But the Middle Ages had very different ideas about the ownership of texts and writers participated in a larger discursive community of artistic production and exchange. Imitation implies both similarity and difference; our goal in this course is to understand how the Middle Ages approached originality and creativity within this framework. Where did medieval writers and readers locate novelty? How are stories transformed in the retelling, and what ideological ends do these transformations serve? How do issues like nationality, language, religion, gender, and history inform the use of earlier texts? Why do some stories have such longevity in the cultural imagination, and how do the medieval author and the medieval reader figure in this diffusion of narrative? Though focusing on the High Middle Ages, the readings for this course will range from late classical antiquity to the Renaissance, including such authors as St. Augustine, Chrétien de Troyes, Dante, Boccaccio, Chaucer, Marguerite de Navarre, St. Ignatius of Loyola, and Shakespeare.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1089 Special Topics   3 cr.
25910 AT Th 01:00 PM-04:50 PM 00302 CL Italian History on Film   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 19 Landy,Marcia 

From the time of silent movies to the present, Italian cinema has been devoted to films that address critical moments in Italian history, Through pertinent readings and screenings, this course will explore Italian cinema’s predilection for particular moments from the past and present that shed light on Italian culture. The films under examination will include Bitter Rice (De Santis), (I vitelloni (Fellini, 1953), Red Desert, (Antonioni, 1959), The Leopard (Visconti, 1960), The Great War (Monicelli, 1959), Salvatore Giuliano (Rosi, 1960), Mamma Roma (Pasolini, 1962), My Name Is Nobody (Leone, 1973), 1900 (Bertolucci, 1976), Father Master (Taviani, 1977), Aclà (Grimaldi, 1992), Life Is Beautiful (Benigni, 1997), Sleepless (Argento, 2001), The Caiman (Moretti, 2006), Gomorra (Garrone, 2008), ll divo (Sorrentino, 2008) Reality (Garrone, 2012), Readings on the films and on social history will include Karl Schoonover, Brutal Vision, John David Rhodes, Stupendous, Miserable City: Pasolini’s Rome Ellen Nerenberg, Murder Made in Italy. No prerequisites. No knowledge of Italian is required.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1902 Directed Study   1 to 4 cr.
10023 AT  - 01325 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Savoia,Francesca 

A description is not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1905 Internship In Italian   1 to 6 cr.
10979 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Savoia,Francesca 

A description is not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2410 Settecento   3 cr.
27857 AT Tu 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 01325 CL The Art of Writing Letters in the 18th century   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 8 Savoia, Francesca 

• Freed from the more rigid rhetorical parameters of the past, the ‘letter’ begins to satisfy – in 18th century Europe – an extraordinary variety of functions: besides continuing to allow remote communication between people, and to be a fundamental vehicle of information and cultural exchange, it becomes the preferred form to give to one’s travel accounts, literary criticism, socio-political commentary and moral or philosophical musing. It is used to celebrate great, historical events as well as to chronicle daily domestic ones; it is employed as a narrative, fictional device, as well as a basic exercise to boost students’ linguistic and compositional skills. The course wants to address 18th-century letter-writing trends from an Italian stand point. Authors whose letters we will study include: Pietro Metastasio, Carlo Goldoni, Giuseppe Baretti, Pietro e Alessandro Verri, Vittorio Alfieri e Ugo Foscolo. • Prerequisites: graduate standing or permission of the instructor. • Evaluation: class participation 30%, in-class presentations 30%, research paper 40% • Not applicable. • Expected size: 8 students • This course is not offered on a regular basis.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2701 Special Topics   3 cr.
25738 AT We 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 01325 CL Betrayal, scandal, violence. Seminar in Translation Studies   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 12 Insana,Lina N 

Whether we consider the old Italian saying “tradurre, tradire,” or more recent critical work underscoring the “scandals” of translation a, the transfer of signification across linguistic boundaries is never a transparent one. Not only must Translation Studies attend to the complex apparatus of mediation that accompanies any translation act, but scholars have—since the Translation Studies “turn” in the 1980s—been increasingly concerned with the ethics of the “task” of translation, whether in the form of a betrayal of “original” meaning; the “scandals” of the translator’s creative and economic invisibility; or the transgressive violence implied in any power hierarchy, whether linguistic, gendered, or political; textual or cultural. In our attempt to introduce students to translation as a critical category, we will begin by briefly tracing the history of the field, from classical notions of translation to Romantic ones. We will then examine a number of commentaries on the nature and position of translation, from Roman Jakobson and Walter Benjamin to Paul DeMan and Jacques Derrida, as we attempt to place this mode of transmission in the context of contemporary critical discourses and situate translation’s implications for a wide range of transmissional modes: adaptation, appropriation, citation, and refraction, to name a few. Participants in this seminar will be asked to execute a number of translation exercises of their own. In addition, they will be asked to reflect on a published translation from a translation studies (as opposed to purely philological) standpoint, in the form of a final essay, or alternately, to produce a significant (20 pages) and original annotated translation. 2.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Note: Students who register for this course should know English and at least one other language well enough to translate from each to the other. 3.Recitations: None. 4.Estimated Class Size: 10-15 5.This course is offered infrequently.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2902 Directed Study   1 to 3 cr.
10024 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Insana,Lina N 

A description is not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2910 Comprehensive Examination Ma   1 to 3 cr.
10025 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 3 Insana,Lina N 

A description is not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2990 Independent Study   1 to 3 cr.
10026 AT  - 01300 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Insana,Lina N 

A description is not available at this time.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

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