University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

FR Courses 2151

0001 Elementary French 1   5 cr.
10050 AT MoTuWeThFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 00249 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Ferreira, Laurine 
10051 AT MoTuWeThFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00335 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Zaddam, Mohammed Mehdi 
10052 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00335 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22  
11835 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 0244B CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Boyer, Gabriel 
20554 AT MoTuWeThFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00335 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Ertunga, Mert 

This five-hour-per-week course introduces students to the French language, and is designed to develop both linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in both spoken and written French. Because the focus is on task-centered communication, the class is conducted entirely in the target language. Course objectives for Elementary French 0001 are: a) to speak French well enough to describe, narrate and ask simple questions in the present about a variety of everyday topics such as family, work, eating and traveling; b) to understand French well enough to grasp main ideas in short conversations about everyday topics; c) to understand simple written French well enough to grasp main ideas; d) to write sentences and short paragraphs on everyday topics; f) to develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures; f) to understand, at a very basic level, how French functions as a language. This course is for students with little or no previous exposure to the language and its cultures. TAUGHT IN FRENCH Prerequisite(s): none Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0002 Elementary French 2 L    5 cr.
10053 AT MoTuWeThFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 0244B CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Bey-Rozet, Maxime 
11803 AT MoWe 06:00 PM-08:05 PM 00253 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Grove, Sylvia 
12757 AT MoTuWeThFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 0208A CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Veroni, Chiara 

As a continuation of French 0001, this five-hour-per-week course (re)introduces students to the French language, building on skills gained in French 1. Culturally-contextualized comprehension and production abilities in both written and spoken form are stressed. Because the focus is on communication, French 0002 is taught entirely in the target language. Objectives for Elementary French 0002 are: to speak French well enough to ask for and give autobiographical information (names, ages, birthdates, places of origin, occupation); to talk about friends and family and one’s immediate environment; to talk about likes and dislikes (food, preferences, sports, leisure time); to talk about university life (courses, daily schedule, current residence). By the end of the course, students should be able to identify the main ideas, purpose and some supporting details of uncomplicated authentic target-language texts with clear underlying structures that describe everyday activities of a personal and/or social nature, i.e., travel brochures, schedules, menus, advertisements, maps and signs, popular press articles, etc. Students in French 0002 continue to develop a deeper understanding of the cultural products, practices and perspectives of French-speaking lands and how French works as a language. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0003 Intermediate French 1 L    3 cr.
10054 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00242 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Rizk, Dahlia 
10055 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00242 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Rizk, Dahlia 
11834 SE3 TuTh 06:00 PM-07:15 PM 00226 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Wallace, Paul 

This intermediate, three hour-per-week course builds on the skills acquired during the first year of study in French 1 and 2, while further developing linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in French. Because the focus is on communication, the course is taught entirely in the target language. Course objectives for French 3 are as follows: 1) speak French well enough to ask and answer questions in various situations beyond what is needed to simply "survive" in a francophone culture, i.e., the ability to talk about self and surroundings in some detail; 2) understand enough spoken French to grasp main ideas and some supporting details in short conversations related to topics above; 3) read well enough to understand principal themes and most details in simple literary and non-literary texts; 4) write longer and more cohesive paragraphs; 5) cultivate a deeper understanding of French-speaking cultures; 6) gain a better understanding of how French works as a language. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0004 Intermediate French 2   3 cr.
10056 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00349 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Wells, Brett 
10057 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00352 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Ganster, Anne 
11833 AT MoWeFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 00349 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Wells, Brett 

As a continuation of French 3, this 3-hour course builds on the linguistic and sociolinguistic skills acquired in French 3. The focus is on communication and instruction is entirely in the target language. Course objectives for French 4 are as follows: 1) speak French well enough to ask and answer questions in various situations beyond what is needed to simply "get along" in a francophone culture, i.e., the ability to talk about self and surroundings with a bit of detail; 2) understand enough spoken French to grasp main ideas and some supporting details in short conversations related to topics above; 3) read well enough to understand principal themes and most details in simple literary and non-literary texts; 4) write longer and more cohesive paragraphs; 5) cultivate a deeper understanding of French-speaking cultures; 6) gain a better understanding of how French works as a language. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0004 Intermediate French 2   3 cr.
29930 AT MoWeFr 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00525 THACK     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Veroni, Chiara 

As a continuation of French 3, this 3-hour course builds on the linguistic and sociolinguistic skills acquired in French 3. The focus is on communication and instruction is entirely in the target language. Course objectives for French 4 are as follows: 1) speak French well enough to ask and answer questions in various situations beyond what is needed to simply "get along" in a francophone culture, i.e., the ability to talk about self and surroundings with a bit of detail; 2) understand enough spoken French to grasp main ideas and some supporting details in short conversations related to topics above; 3) read well enough to understand principal themes and most details in simple literary and non-literary texts; 4) write longer and more cohesive paragraphs; 5) cultivate a deeper understanding of French-speaking cultures; 6) gain a better understanding of how French works as a language.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0006 Special Topics In Convr & Cult   1 to 6 cr.
28938 SE3 We 06:00 PM-06:50 PM 00330 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 21 Ganster, Anne 

This one-unit course provides extra conversation practice at the intermediate levels (French 0003 and French 0004). Students do not have to be enrolled in French 3 or 4 to enroll in this one-unit conversation hour, but should have at least a French 3 level in speaking and listening to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0020 France In The 21st Century REG   3 cr.
12173 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00G13 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Doshi, Neil 
20377 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00330 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Pettersen, David 

This course is designed to lead students to a better understanding of France today. We pay particular attention to different forms of identity in France: national, religious, regional, ethnic. Wherever feasible, class discussion will center on primary documents (newspapers, magazines, films, cartoons, public opinion polls, etc.). Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0021 or 0027 or 0055 or 0056 (MIN GRADE: 'C' for all listed Courses)

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0021 Apprches To French Literature LIT    3 cr.
11600 AT MoWeFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM 00226 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Doshi, Neil 

The purpose of this course is to illustrate ways of looking at literary texts. We shall examine poems, prose works and plays from France and the francophone world, trying to answer some of the following questions: What are the characteristics of these different genres? What is specifically literary in the text? How can reading such a text make us more able to understand today's world? Considering these questions should make students more familiar with French-language literary production and also help them understand the literary phenomenon in general.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0027 or 0055 or 0056 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0027 The French Atlantic HS  REG   3 cr.
20683 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00242 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Walsh III, John 

In this course we will explore the encounter between Europeans, Africans and Americans in the New World. The course is designed to give students a historical perspective on the French presence in the Americas, with a particular emphasis on the period that ranges from the early 16th century to the early 19th century. The course is taught entirely in French. Our goal is to encourage students to read, contextualize and understand important documents in the original language, while promoting development of their written and oral expression in order to more effectively communicate that understanding.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0021 or 0055 or 0056 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0055 French Conversation   3 cr.
12035 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00237 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Tomkowicz, Paulina 
20684 AT TuTh 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 00202 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Fontanel,Remi 

This three-unit conversation course is designed to develop students’ oral French skills in the widest sense of the term. Emphasis is placed mastering illocutionary speech acts and improving sociolinguistic competence so that students are better able to communicate with French-speaking people in French-speaking environments. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0021 or 0027 or 0056 (MIN GRADE: 'C' for all listed Courses)

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0056 Written French 1   3 cr.
10058 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00236 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Hogg, Chloe 

The course is designed to promote the development of writing skills through a writing-as-process approach. Class work and written assignments will include journal writing, grammar review, vocabulary development, and analysis of model texts. Based on close work with models, students will then craft substantial compositions, each illustrating a function (narration, description) or a genre (essay, film review). Attention will be given to helping students improve as writers by learning to analyze, edit, and revise their own work.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0004 or 0020 or 0021 or 0027 or 0055 (MIN GRADE:

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0058 Advanced French Conversation   1 cr.
10059 AT MoWe 12:00 PM-12:50 PM 00306 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Wallace, Paul 

This one-unit class at once builds on and complements French 55. It is designed to improve students’ oral proficiency and sociolinguistic competence through contextualized simulated immersion. The course is divided into four sections, each demanding different, but complementary social and linguistic skills, to wit 1) getting to know people and places; 2) current events; 3) debate and disagreement; 4) cultural comparisons. Emphasis is on acquiring the authentic oral communication skills, in the widest sense of the term, necessary to navigate expertly French-speaking environments. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: FR 0055

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0080 Modern French Novel LIT  W  3 cr.
12174 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00204 CL   WRIT   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Boum-Make, Jen 
26592 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00129 CL   WRIT   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 22 Hogg, Chloe 

This course is and introduction to the modern French novel as developed in France. We will explore gender and national identity, racial issues, embodiment, the natural world, political violence, aesthetic experience, memory, and practices of freedom. Spanning the second half of the twentieth century, we will explore a variety of modern literary techniques and concerns associated with surrealism, négritude, existentialism, the New Novel, écriture féminine, decolonization, and post-colonial thought. This course fulfills the Writing Requirement (not a credit requirement) for the French major and the LIT general education requirement. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1018 20th Century Topics   3 cr.
27456 AT MoWeFr 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00349 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Fontanel, Remi 

This course introduces students to aspects of Twentieth Century Film production in France and the French tradition. TAUGHT IN FRENCH

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1032 Adv Grammar And Stylistics   3 cr.
27458 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00218 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Pettersen, David 

This sixth semester course introduces French language students to the advanced structures necessary for functionally higher-level production. Each area of grammatical inquiry is taught as serving particular speech acts, e.g., explanation, description, narration, interrogation, giving orders, speaking with tact, etc.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1088 Special Topics   3 cr.
28929 AT MoWeFr 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00335 CL "French Kiss: Love, Sex, France"   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 50 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

From kissing to romantic escapades, from Paris to the Riviera, from Tahiti to Marrakesh, France and the Francophone world have a highly recognizable profile in matters of sex and love. Sexual behavior is always culturally inflected, and it evolves through time in its creation of emotions, attachments, families and institutions. In this class, we will adopt a historical lens to retrace the cultural transformations of sex and love in the French cultural and social landscape. We will study contemporary visual and textual materials, and a variety of historical documents from the Middle Ages to the present day. We will address controversial issues such as virginity, adultery, same-sex relationships, women’s sexual agency, gender definitions through sexuality, the shifting boundaries of pornography and other related matters. This is a first-year course open both to incoming and more advanced students. It will count toward the French major and minor. This course is taught in English; no French language required and no prerequisites.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1902 Directed Study   1 to 3 cr.
10060 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Wells, Brett 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1903 Honors Dir Research:Fr Majors   1 to 3 cr.
10061 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Wells, Brett 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1905 Internship In French   1 to 6 cr.
11198 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Wells, Brett 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2105 Seminar: Medieval Topic   3 cr.
27460 AT We 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 01325 CL "Autour du Roman de la Rose"   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 12 Blumenfield-Kosinski, Renate 

The Roman de la Rose was one of the central texts of the middle ages; in its encyclopedic nature it embodies almost all the major trends of medieval culture. The first part by Guillaume de Lorris (ca. 1230) is an intricate love allegory. The second part by Jean de Meun (ca. 1270) continues the allegory but also contains fascinating discourses on such topics as reason vs. love, art vs. nature, love stratagems, or procreative sexuality. Issues of gender and sexuality come to the fore in the discourses of Reason, Nature, and Genius. Far from advocating a clear compulsory heterosexuality (as older criticism argues), the Rose is replete with homoerotic subtexts. Mythological intertexts, such as the stories of masculine self-love (Narcissus) and of the birth of Venus engendered by the severed genitals of Uranus, also contribute to the discussion of ambiguous sexualities as well as to our understanding of the role and function of classical mythology in medieval culture. In addition to the romance itself this course will examine its ancestors, its descendants, and its later polemical context. We will read parts of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, and texts by Guillaume de Machaut as well as Christine de Pizan’s Débat du Roman de la Rose of 1401-02, one of the most important medieval debates on issues of gender, sexuality, and allegorical representation. A website with 250 digitized Rose manuscripts will allow us to do iconographic and comparative studies, taking us into the early modern period. An introduction to Old French grammar and syntax will also be part of the course. The course will be taught in French with readings in modern French and English. Prerequisites: Knowledge of modern French. Some knowledge of French medieval literature and culture will be helpful.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2710 Intro Literary & Cultl Theory   3 cr.
11996 AT Tu 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 01325 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ GER 2110 ITAL 2710 RUSS 2110  Enroll Limit 5 Reeser, Todd 

What is an author? What is a text? What is a sign? What is reading? What is interpretation? What is power? What is gender? What is race? What is a nation? And what does all this have to do with literary and cultural texts anyway? In this course for beginning graduate students in the modern languages, we will survey major movements and concepts in literary and cultural theory of the 20th/21st centuries. These theories have provided us important ways to think about how to read and interpret literature, film, and other cultural artifacts, and, as such, are an important aspect of graduate studies in the Humanities. Seemingly basic questions such as "what is an author?" or "what is literature?" are in fact hugely complicated questions that demand that we think about them if we are to think in sophisticated terms about literature and culture. This course is meant to provide you a general background in theory that you can further develop in certain areas as you continue on in graduate school. After a one-week introduction to the concept of theory, we will read about key movements (Eagleton) at the same time as we conduct careful close readings of key theoretical texts (including Bakhtin, Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, Butler, Sedgwick, Bhabha, and others). Assignments will focus on regular responses to the readings, on short papers, and on sustained contributions to class discussion as we work as a team to process these sometimes difficult texts. The course will be taught in English, and all readings will be available in English (though those able to read the texts in the original are encouraged to do so).

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2765 Comparative Francophone Cult   3 cr.
27461 AT Th 02:30 PM-04:55 PM 01325 CL “Mapping Afropea: Afropeans, Afropolitans, and the African Diaspora in Europe”   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 12 Walsh III, John 

In a recent essay the French-Cameroonian writer, Léonora Miano, writes: “Afropea is, in France, the mental locale that those who are unable to claim the privilege of French stock give to themselves” (Habiter la frontière, 2012). Following the more existential meaning of “Afropean” she had begun in her fiction, notably Afropean Soul et autres nouvelles (2008) and Blues pour Elise (2010), Miano claims that Afropea remains a mental construct, superimposed over physical realities known to the immigrant that do not live up to the imagined country. This seminar explores the mapping of “Afropea” in the literature of authors of African origins who explore the linguistic and cultural translation that occurs between the Africa and Europe. We will study a range of primary texts, including Zadie Smith’s White Teeth; Abdourahman Waberi’s Transit (2003); Alain Mabanckou’s Black Bazar (2009); and Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go (2013). All shed light on the lived experiences of multiple generations of Africans who have transformed, and have been transformed by, Europe. In the attempt to make sense of the use of terms of identity formations, we will engage the critical debates generated by discourses on the “Afropean” and “Afropolitan.” The latter designation in particular, which was coined by Selasi in “Bye Bye Babar or What is an Afropolitan?” (2005), and shortly thereafter entered academic circles in Achille Mbembe’s essay “Afropolitanism” (2006), has become a divisive topic. On one hand, critics such as Binyavanga Wainaina, point to the consumerism of a privileged cosmopolitanism, and thus lament its association with cultural commodification, especially in the worlds of fine art and fashion. On the other, Selasi embraces its valorization of the historical fluidity and mixing of African identities. The lack of consensus at the intersection of aesthetic and political forms of expression provides a compelling background for our seminar. The course will be taught in English. All readings will be available in translation.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2902 Directed Study   1 to 12 cr.
10062 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2910 Comprehensive Examination Ma   1 to 3 cr.
10063 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2970 Teaching Of French   3 cr.
10064 AT Mo 02:00 PM-04:25 PM 05131 WWPH     No recitation. Combined w/ ITAL 2970 SPAN 2307 FR 2975  Enroll Limit 5 Donato, Richard 

Teaching French, Italian, and German [for beginning TAs] /Advanced Topics in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching [for advanced TAs] This course supports the concept that instructional expertise is developed in and through teaching. Using a modified "lesson study model" of teacher development, new and experienced foreign language instructors will work together to identify problems of practice, discuss the theory and instructional practices that address these pedagogical concerns, and collaboratively develop a lesson to be taught by a member of the class and later analyzed and refined by the class as a whole. Videotapes of these lessons will be used as the primary source of information for analysis, discussion, and reflection. Four major areas will ground our work: 1) designing lessons to promote a language learning community, 2) teaching culture through language, and language through culture, 3) advancing oral language proficiency, and 4) developing literacy in a foreign language. Assignments include participation in collaborative lesson plan development, reflective reports on videotapes of classroom instruction, written analysis of tutorial work with language learners, and a culminating project developed in stages throughout the course that unifies the four themes in a statement of teaching philosophy. Not language specific, this course is intended for current and future teachers in the modern foreign languages.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2975 Adv Topics Frgn Lang Lrng Tch   3 cr.
18943 AT Mo 02:00 PM-04:25 PM 05131 WWPH     No recitation. Combined w/ FR 2970 ITAL 2970 SPAN 2307  Enroll Limit 1 Donato, Richard 

Teaching French, Italian, and German [for beginning TAs] /Advanced Topics in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching [for advanced TAs] This course supports the concept that instructional expertise is developed in and through teaching. Using a modified "lesson study model" of teacher development, new and experienced foreign language instructors will work together to identify problems of practice, discuss the theory and instructional practices that address these pedagogical concerns, and collaboratively develop a lesson to be taught by a member of the class and later analyzed and refined by the class as a whole. Videotapes of these lessons will be used as the primary source of information for analysis, discussion, and reflection. Four major areas will ground our work: 1) designing lessons to promote a language learning community, 2) teaching culture through language, and language through culture, 3) advancing oral language proficiency, and 4) developing literacy in a foreign language. Assignments include participation in collaborative lesson plan development, reflective reports on videotapes of classroom instruction, written analysis of tutorial work with language learners, and a culminating project developed in stages throughout the course that unifies the four themes in a statement of teaching philosophy. Not language specific, this course is intended for current and future teachers in the modern foreign languages.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

2990 Independent Study   1 to 12 cr.
10065 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3000 Research And Dissertation Phd   1 to 15 cr.
10066 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 16 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered. 3902 Directed Study

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3902 Directed Study   1 to 12 cr.
10067 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 5 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3905 Teaching Apprenticeship   1 to 12 cr.
11066 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 10 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

3910 Comprehensive Examination   1 to 12 cr.
10068 AT  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Mecchia, Giuseppina 

Description not available at this time. Prerequisite(s): none

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

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