University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

CLASS Courses 2177

0010 Greek Civilization REG   3 cr.
19797 6W1 MoWe 12:00 PM-03:15 PM 00221 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Newell,John F 

This course will survey the major achievements of ancient Greek civilization. Arranged on a roughly chronological basis, the readings and lectures will move from the epic poetry of Greece's heroic Bronze Age, through the great intellectual innovations of the Archaic Age, to the Classical era dominated by the contrasting contributions of Sparta and Athens. Although the social and economic background will not be neglected, the chief emphasis will be placed on those aspects of Greek civilization that have retained a perennial significance for Western societies— its literature, its politics, its historical writing, its philosophy, its art and architecture. Prerequisite(s): none This course is offered at least once a year.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0020 Roman Civilization REG   3 cr.
19038 6W2 MoWe 02:00 PM-05:15 PM 00221 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 25 Korzeniewski,Andrew J. 

Beginning as a small farming settlement situated alongside the Tiber river, Rome rose to become one of the greatest civilizations in human history, which spread its influence over much of the western world. In addition to careful investigation into the social, political, military, and economic organization of Rome as it developed from a monarchy through a republic and into an empire, the class will examine the art, architecture, literature, religion, culture, and daily life of the city across the spectrum of social classes. The class will utilize the large body of surviving Roman literature, including histories, poetry, and personal letters (in translation), as well as visual aids, such as slides and films, to create a living picture of whom the Romans were. Class time will be used for lectures as well as student lead discussion.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0030 Mythology In The Ancient World REG   3 cr.
10444 6W1 TuTh 08:30 AM-11:45 AM 00G13 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ RELGST 0083      Enroll Limit 30 Jones,Nicholas F 

Our subject will be the traditional stories--myths, legends, and folktales--of the Greeks and Romans. Traditional stories are ones that, by virtue of some compelling attraction, manage to survive from generation to generation, so our main task will be to discover just what that 'compelling attraction' was. The creation of the universe, the first woman Pandora, the Twelve Gods and Goddesses, the theft of fire by Prometheus, Helen and the Trojan War, the foundation of Rome by Aeneas, and Ovid's fanciful metamorphoses are examples of the stories from our modern illustrated reader Classical Myth by Barry B. Powell. By way of providing a context for our stories, the instructor will also devote much attention to such topics as popular belief and superstition, cult rituals, sanctuaries of the gods, oracles and prophets, the conceptualization of male and female, sexuality, and the social and cultural basis of myth in general. Throughout, we shall examine the many theories about the meaning of traditional stories from antiquity down to our own day.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0037 Myth In Ancnt World/Writ Prac W  1 cr.
18490 6W1  - TBA TBA   WRIT   No recitation. Combined w/ RELGST 0084      Enroll Limit 12 Jones,Nicholas F 

Writing students will fulfill the requirements of the College Writing Board by submitting a paper in draft form, to be revised and resubmitted in line with its evaluation by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): none This course is offered at least once a year.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0100 Masterpieced in Greek and Roman Literature  
20590  12:00AM- TBA TBA       Enroll Limit Bromberg, Jacques 

Is there a pattern of human behavior? Would man pursue his extravagant projects if he appreciated the price he must pay for them? Personal vendetta or law-court justice? What limits must the state observe towards the individual and vice versa? These are central questions in early European literature, and they have never lost their relevance. The course opens with the laborious homecoming of Odysseus after the siege of Troy (Homer’s Odyssey), then moves on to the heroic lyrics of Pindar, poems written in celebration and commemoration of victorious athletes. We then turn to the quest for justice in Aeschylus’ Oresteia, a tragic trilogy illustrating the dangers of vendetta and charting the development of democratic jurisprudence. Our final selections consider mankind’s place in history (Thucydides), before turning to the confrontation between philosopher and community: Socrates, depicted by his student Plato (Apology, Crito, Phaedo). The masterpieces of Classical Greek and Roman literature engage their readers not only through their stimulating and insightful depictions of the human condition, but also through their diverse and idiosyncratic forms. Analyzing the formal elements is a major objective of this introductory course. Students will acquire basic skills necessary for reading both ancient and later literatures, and will develop skills in analysis, discussion, and exposition. All texts are read in English translations.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1130 Classical Mythology & Lit EX  REG   3 cr.
17287 12W We 06:00 PM-09:15 PM 00221 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ RELGST 1144      Enroll Limit 25 Scott,Wesley B 

This course will be taught essentially as a literature course; that is to say, attention will be focused on how various authors of classical (chiefly Greek) antiquity used the traditional figures and stories of their culture's mythology in order to say things of lasting value about the conditions and problems of human life. We shall begin with the emergence of the cosmos as recounted in Hesiod's Theogony and then take up each of the major Olympian dieties in turn, studying the ways in which they are depicted in other works of Greek literature, including the Homeric Hymns, various plays by Aeschylus and Euripides, and Homer's Odyssey.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

1210 Greek History HS  REG   3 cr.
19045 6W2 TuTh 12:00 PM-03:15 PM 00249 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 1783      Enroll Limit 15 Bromberg,Jacques Albert 

This course will survey the history of ancient Greece from the Minoan civilization in the second millennium BC to the end of the Classical Period in the 4th century BC. We will investigate the major political, intellectual, economic and social factors that contributed to the nature and development of Greek history. We will pay particular attention to the Golden Age of Athens in the 5th century BC and its relations with the Persian Empire, Sparta and the other Greek city-states. Also, we will look at the many political and cultural institutions that combined to make this age unique. Finally, the course will close with the Greek's efforts to cope with the rising power of Macedon.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1220 Roman History HS  REG   3 cr.
18498 6W1 TuTh 12:00 PM-03:15 PM 00249 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 1781      Enroll Limit 15 Korzeniewski,Andrew J. 

This course is a survey of Roman history from the founding of the city in the 8th century B.C.E. to the collapse of the Western Empire in the 5th century C.E. The history of Rome is the story of how a city-state first unified the Italian peninsula under its military and political leadership; how it then developed into a Mediterranean Empire which, at its greatest territorial extent, stretched from Britain in the West to the Tigris and Euphrates in the East; and how it finally lost political and military control of its empire which broke apart into what became the states of Medieval Europe. As we read a modern narrative history of Rome and the works of Roman and Greek historians, we will examine how Rome acquired and governed its empire; under what forms of government and under whose leadership the affairs of the Roman People were administered; and what causes led to the breakup of the Roman Empire.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

1430 Origins Of Christianity HS  REG   3 cr.
18493 6W1 TuTh 06:00 PM-09:15 PM 02320 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 1775 RELGST 1120    Enroll Limit 9 Ferda,Tucker S. 

This course presents an historical-critical investigation of Christian origins. Special attention is paid to varieties of 1st century Hellenistic and Palestinian Judaism within the Greco-Roman world. Primary readings include selected Biblical passages and apocrypha, 1st century historians and philosophers (Josephus, Tacitus, Suetonius, and Philo), the New Testament corpus (including Paul and the Pastorals), and selected readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls. In addition there will be assignments from various modern New Testament critics, historians, and theologians.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1610 Greek Archaeology   3 cr.
20018 ST  - TBA TBA     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Bromberg,Jacques Albert 

This course introduces students to the archaeologist’s task of bringing lost societies back to light through the study of their physical remains and material culture. From the search by aristocrats and antiquarians for ancient sites known only in myth and legend, the practice of Archaeology has developed over the last 150 years into a rigorous academic discipline. By studying ancient Greek art, architecture, inscriptions, burials, and the many everyday objects that survive from antiquity, archaeologists are able to shine light on details of Greek society that are often totally inaccessible from the surviving literary and historiographical record: details of the ancient economy, for example, the political processes of individual city-states and their varying cults and religious rituals, as well as the everyday lives of ancient Greeks from all classes and backgrounds. For over a century, Classical Archaeologists have developed scientific methods of identifying, studying, documenting, and preserving cultural heritage sites throughout the Mediterranean, and we have pioneered a variety of digital approaches including 3D scanning and printing, GIS and text-image mapping. The course begins with examination of the archaeology of the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-11o B.C.) and presents a survey of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods (1100-31 B.C.), as well as a history of the archaeological discipline itself from the nineteenth century to today.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

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