University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

CLASS Courses 2181

0010 Greek Civilization REG   3 cr.
19972 AT MoWe 04:30 PM-05:45 PM 00203 FKART     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 35 Weaver,Carrie L 

The innovations and advances of the Greeks provided the intellectual foundation for western civilization. This undergraduate course surveys the major achievements of the ancient Greek world from its earliest beginnings in the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the age of Alexander and his Hellenistic successors (ca. 100 BCE). In particular, emphasis will be placed on Greek literature, politics, historical writing, religion, philosophy, medicine, architecture, and visual arts. The course will conclude with a discussion of the ways in which ancient Greek culture has remained relevant to Western civilization from antiquity until the modern day.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0010 Greek Civilization REG   3 cr.
27348 SE3 We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00337 CL   CGS-Day No recitation.   Enroll Limit 35 Scott, Wesley 

This course will survey the major achievements of ancient Greek civilization. Arranged on a roughly chronological basis, the readings and lectures will move from the epic poetry of Greece's heroic Bronze Age, through the great intellectual innovations of the Archaic Age, to the Classical era dominated by the contrasting contributions of Sparta and Athens. Although the social and economic background will not be neglected, the chief emphasis will be placed on those aspects of Greek civilization that have retained a perennial significance for Western societies— its literature, its politics, its historical writing, its philosophy, its art and architecture.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0010 Greek Civilization REG   3 cr.
27904 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00203 FKART     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 35 Weaver,Carrie L 

The innovations and advances of the Greeks provided the intellectual foundation for western civilization. This undergraduate course surveys the major achievements of the ancient Greek world from its earliest beginnings in the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the age of Alexander and his Hellenistic successors (ca. 100 BCE). In particular, emphasis will be placed on Greek literature, politics, historical writing, religion, philosophy, medicine, architecture, and visual arts. The course will conclude with a discussion of the ways in which ancient Greek culture has remained relevant to Western civilization from antiquity until the modern day.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0020 Roman Civilization REG   3 cr.
29449 SE3 We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00363 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 40 Newell, John 

Beginning as a small farming settlement situated alongside the Tiber river, Rome rose to become one of the greatest civilizations in human history, which spread its influence over much of the western world. In addition to careful investigation into the social, political, military, and economic organization of Rome as it developed from a monarchy through a republic and into an empire, the class will examine the art, architecture, literature, religion, culture, and daily life of the city across the spectrum of social classes. The class will utilize the large body of surviving Roman literature, including histories, poetry, and personal letters (in translation), as well as visual aids, such as slides and films, to create a living picture of whom the Romans were. Class time will be used for lectures as well as student lead discussion.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0030 Mythology In The Ancient World REG   3 cr.
11392 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00G36 BENDM     No recitation. Combined w/ RELGST 0083      Enroll Limit 40 Jones,Marilyn Morgan 

Our subject will be the traditional stories--myths, legends, and folktales--of the Greeks and Romans. Traditional stories are ones that, by virtue of some compelling attraction, manage to survive from generation to generation, so our main task will be to discover just what that 'compelling attraction' was. The creation of the universe, the first woman Pandora, the Twelve Gods and Goddesses, the theft of fire by Prometheus, Helen and the Trojan War, the foundation of Rome by Aeneas, and Ovid's fanciful metamorphoses are examples of the stories from our modern illustrated reader Classical Myth by Barry B. Powell. By way of providing a context for our stories, the instructor will also devote much attention to such topics as popular belief and superstition, cult rituals, sanctuaries of the gods, oracles and prophets, the conceptualization of male and female, sexuality, and the social and cultural basis of myth in general. Throughout, we shall examine the many theories about the meaning of traditional stories from antiquity down to our own day.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0032 Athletics of the Ancient World   3 cr.
31071 AT MoWe 03:00 PM-04:15 PM 03415 WWPH     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Bromberg, Jacques 

From their mysterious origins to their modern fanfare, the Olympic Games have maintained a firm grip on the public imagination for nearly twenty-eight centuries. These and other ancient athletic festivals are among the most enduring legacies of the Classical world, and provide a particularly accessible introduction to the study of antiquity. This course takes a chronological approach, parallel to the histories of ancient Greece and Rome, and introduces students to the origins and growth of Greek competitive athletics (especially at Olympia), the rise of professional athletes, and the evolving role of athletes and athletics in society. Through examination of literary and historiographical sources (in translation) and of the material remains of ancient athletic sites, we study the evolution of the festivals and the history of modern approaches to ancient athletic competitions. We spend the final weeks investigating the origins and history of the modern Olympic movement, from the nineteenth century to today, which contrast sharply with the ancient games and offer an opportunity to think critically about the continuing role of competitive athletics in the cultural politics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. No prerequisites, or previous knowledge of ancient history required.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0330 Myth And Science REG   3 cr.
29696 SE3 We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00304 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ HPS 0427      Enroll Limit 10 Baldissera Pacchetti,Marina 

How can we understand our world? In western culture, science dominates all our answers to this question. But there are other ways. They can be found in the mythologies of ancient and modern peoples. This course will compare the scientific and mythological ways of seeing the world and their more subtle connections. In particular, we will turn to the remarkable events in Ancient Greece of 800-400 B.C. and discover how the scientific approach actually grew slowly out of mythological thought itself.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0400 Ancient Empires MA  EX  HS  IFN  COM   3 cr.
29622 SE3 Tu 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00204 FKART     No recitation. Combined w/ HAA 0160      Enroll Limit 25 Weis, H Anne 

Successful empires are seldom planned; they evolve. They typically have charismatic founders, able successors, and well-organized systems of administration. They satisfy core constituencies by ensuring supplies of staples or, for elites, luxuries and status symbols. They ward off potential unrest by various means, from moving populations to the cooptation of local elites, who control capital and production. The course looks at the phenomenon of the (ancient) empire from various points of view—the biographies of selected “founder figures” and the mechanisms created to ensure the survival of selected regimes, with less emphasis placed on bureaucratic structures and detail and more on the creation and maintenance of an ideology appropriate to the regime. A sense of tradition, for example, is essential to empire but only if combined with a sense of “modernity”—the projection of an ability to mobilize the latest in science and technology to preserve the benefits of empire for those who profit from it. Empires are, in this sense, “history-conscious”—they compare themselves with earlier empires and seek to surpass them. Empires examined include: Middle Bronze Age Akkad, late Bronze Age Egypt, Early Iron age Assyria and Persia, Classical Athens, Macedon, and early Imperial Rome. This is not a writing course per se, but it attempts, through feedback on a series of short, focused essays, to be written in class and/or out of class, and a Research Paper, to work with students’ ability to pose problems, work toward a solution, and articulate that process in writing.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0500 Ancient Art MA  EX  COM   3 cr.
25885 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00202 FKART     No recitation. Combined w/ HAA 0150      Enroll Limit 15 Eppihimer,Melissa Ann 

The Mediterranean Sea is a lake and its shores have produced many important cultures and artistic traditions. The course will survey the artistic and cultural traditions of the Near East (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Turkey, Iran) and the Aegean, from the Neolithic to the Persian Empire. Special attention will be paid to: 1) the relationship between the artistic traditions of these areas and the societies which produced them, and 2) the way in which influences from one culture were transformed by another.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0618 Death In The Ancient World MA  COM   3 cr.
29624 AT MoWe 03:00 PM-04:15 PM 00125 FKART     No recitation. Combined w/ HAA 0018      Enroll Limit 70 Weaver,Carrie L 

The death of a loved one is an emotional and powerful occurrence that provokes a variety of human responses. In addition to writings describing their funerary practices, the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean region have left artistic representations of death and dying, built tombs, and objects associated with funerary rituals. The study of these texts, images, structures, and objects allows us to better understand ancient attitudes and reactions to death. This undergraduate lecture course focuses on the visual and material evidence of funerary practices and beliefs in ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman societies. The subject will be approached thematically. First, we will explore how archaeologists discover death-related artifacts and how scholars approach the study and reconstruction of ancient death rituals. Ancient practices and beliefs regarding mummification, the funeral, commemorative strategies, visits to the grave, and the afterlife will be explored, and images found on specific media (vases, sculpture, built tombs, paintings) will be discussed in depth. The course will conclude with discussions of the roles that sensational topics, like fear of the undead (zombies, vampires, and ghosts) and spectacles of death (gladiatorial contests and public executions), played in ancient Mediterranean civilizations.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1050 Computer Methods in Humanities Q   
30383 MoWeFr 10:00 AM-10:50 AM     UHC   Combined w/ ENGLIT 1600 GER 1550 HIST 1030  Enroll Limit Bondar, Greg 

The course carries three credits and satisfies the Arts & Sciences skills requirement for Quantitative and Formal Reasoning. It is one of the very few courses offered at the University of Pittsburgh that are designed specifically to address the knowledge and skills involved in quantitative and formal reasoning within the context of the interests and needs of students in the humanities. The course meets three days a week for fifty minutes and involves a combination of lecture, discussion, and practical programming exercises. There are no prerequisites; in particular, students are not expected to have any prior computer programming experience and they are not required to know any foreign languages. On the other hand, as is the norm for courses with 1000-level numbers, students should have some experience with college-level study, especially in the humanities; this will assist them in identifying interesting humanities research questions, which they will then explore with the computational skills they will acquire in the course. Students may enroll under any of the cross-listed rubrics and both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. Whether the course satisfies requirements for a departmental major is up to the individual departments, and interested students should inquire about this with their major advisors. For undergraduate students, the course carries a University Honors College (UHC) designation. For more information about UHC courses, see http://www.honorscollege.pitt.edu/courses. For information about enrolling in UHC courses, see http://www.honorscollege.pitt.edu/course-eligibility. In addition to CourseWeb (Blackboard), this course has its own web site, which is located at http://dh.obdurodon.org.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

UHC-designated courses: Students below a 3.25 GPA must go to the Honors College for permission. 

1130 Classical Mythology & Lit EX  REG   3 cr.
25888 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00349 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ RELGST 1144      Enroll Limit 20 Hoenig,Christina Maria 

In this course we will examine several well-known ancient myths through the works of various Greek and Roman authors. We will discuss how each author transforms and interprets the myths in accordance with his own methods to these ancient stories as a mirror of the cultural climate contemporary with him. Topics covered include the creation myth of Hesiod's Theogony and the portrayal of the gods of popular Greek and Roman religion through this and other works such as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil's Aeneid. It is the aim of this course to expand the students' understanding of ancient Greek and Roman literary culture and to equip them with a variety of interpretative methodologies.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

1142 Ancient Epic EX    3 cr.
27061 AT MoWe 03:00 PM-04:15 PM 00113 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Korzeniewski,Andrew J. 

Around 1200BCE, a city on the Western coast of modern Turkey was besieged by the Greeks and ultimately burned to the ground. The sacking of Troy, and the lives of the men and women involved its story, soon became the subject of myth, preserved for us in two of the earliest and most famous documents from antiquity, the Iliad and Odyssey, attributed to bard Homer. These epics laid the foundation for the literary and artistic cultures of the ancient Greeks, and then Romans. But how did these two poems, products of the tradition of oral performance by a largely illiterate culture, inspire and influence the development of highly literate cultures for nearly three millennia? This course offers an introduction to ancient epic poetry, its origins, development, and reception. The first part of the semester will focus on ancient epic as oral poetry (embodied by Homer); the second on ancient epic as a literary phenomenon under subsequent Latin authors (namely Vergil and his Aeneid, as well as some more minor Latin epics). To put a bow on the semester, we will ultimately, and ever-so lightly, wade into the waters of medieval and modern-day epics who owe a debt to the classical epics we will have read.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered infrequently.

1210 Greek History HS  REG   3 cr.
20008 AT TuTh 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 00232 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 1783      Enroll Limit 65 Bromberg,Jacques Albert 

How did the inhabitants of hundreds of small and quarrelsome cities in a poor, Mediterranean peninsula collaborate to produce one of human history’s most innovative and influential civilizations? To answer that, we will survey the history of ancient Greece from the Minoan civilization in the second millennium BC to the end of the Classical Period in the 4th century BC. We will investigate the major political, intellectual, economic, and social factors that contributed to the nature and development of Greek history, and consider the many political and cultural institutions that made this age unique. We will focus particularly on the growth and intertwined histories of the Greek city-states (especially Athens and Sparta), their encounters with the Persian Empire, their conflicts with each other, and their efforts to cope with the rising power of Macedon. All readings will be in English

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1312 Plato   3 cr.
24409 SE3 TuTh 04:00 PM-05:15 PM 00144 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ PHIL 1020      Enroll Limit 10  

This course will explore a number of perennial problems through a close reading of Plato’s literary and philosophical masterpiece, The Republic. While examining the ways these problems arise and the answers that Plato gives to them in this influential text, we will be asking ourselves whether these are answers we could endorse. The issues that we will examine will include: What does being a just or good person involve? Why do we want to be good or just? How should our social institutions be structured in order to promote a just state? What should education be like, and what is it for? Is it ever permissible for the government to lie to the people? Is censorship ever justified? What role should women have in society? In order to understand Plato’s answers to these questions, we will delve into his moral psychology (the nature of the soul, of virtue, of moral beliefs, and the relation between reason and emotion) as well as the metaphysical and epistemological aspects of Plato’s Theory of Forms.

Prerequisite(s): PREQ: CLASS 0300 or PHIL 0200

This course is offered at least once a year.

1430 Origins Of Christianity HS  REG   3 cr.
23252 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00232 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ RELGST 1120 HIST 1775    Enroll Limit 20 Denova,Rebecca I 

This course presents an historical-critical investigation of Christian origins. Special attention is paid to varieties of 1st century Hellenistic and Palestinian Judaism within the Greco-Roman world. Primary readings include selected Biblical passages and apocrypha, 1st century historians and philosophers (Josephus, Tacitus, Suetonius, and Philo), the New Testament corpus (including Paul and the Pastorals), and selected readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls. In addition there will be assignments from various modern New Testament critics, historians, and theologians.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

1430 Origins Of Christianity HS  REG   3 cr.
24621 SE3 Tu 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00G13 CL   CGS-Day No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 1775 RELGST 1120    Enroll Limit 5 Denova,Rebecca I 

This course presents an historical-critical investigation of Christian origins. Special attention is paid to varieties of 1st century Hellenistic and Palestinian Judaism within the Greco-Roman world. Primary readings include selected Biblical passages and apocrypha, 1st century historians and philosophers (Josephus, Tacitus, Suetonius, and Philo), the New Testament corpus (including Paul and the Pastorals), and selected readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls. In addition there will be assignments from various modern New Testament critics, historians, and theologians.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

1520 Roman Art MA  REG   3 cr.
26357 AT MoWe 04:30 PM-05:45 PM 00204 FKART     No recitation. Combined w/ HAA 1130      Enroll Limit 10 Weis,H Anne 

HAA 1130: Centrally located within the Mediterranean, Italy was rich in natural resources, under the firm control of civic elites who managed contacts with other cultural groups. Roman “art”, therefore, was an art of advertisement and consumption—one that served to identify the wealthiest and most influential members of the community and to further their interests. The course will follow the development of Rome from an aggressively expansive, aristocratic city-state to a socially innovative political conglomerate with control over the Mediterranean world. This development fostered 1) unprecedented economic stability and prosperity across a wide region, allowing objects and styles that were once limited to the elite to “filter down” to a broader range of consumers, and 2) the need for an art that communicated the achievements and goals of the imperial government to different regions and cultures. This is not a writing course per se, but it attempts, through feedback on a series of short, focused essays, to be written in class and out of class, and a Research Paper, to work with students’ ability to pose problems, work toward a solution, and articulate that process in writing.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered infrequently.

1710 Sanskrit 1   3 cr.
11322 AT MoWeFr 09:00 AM-09:50 AM 00136 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 8 Kesavan, Krishnamurthy 

Sanskrit is the classical language of India. This course can serve as either a one-term introduction to Sanskrit, or (preferably) as a foundation for further work in the language. We will begin with the devanagari writing system and Sanskrit pronunciation. This will be followed by a survey of the essentials of Sanskrit grammar, including noun, pronoun, and verb paradigms, rules of combining sounds when words are joined to one another (sandhi), word order, and use of particles. There will not be so much focus on developing an extensive vocabulary in the first term of study; however, the course will be directed toward eventually reading material from Sanskrit texts such as the Mahabharata and Hitopadesa in second-year Sanskrit. A comprehensive beginning text such as Egenes, Introduction to Sanskrit, Part 1 will be covered in the Fall term.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

2090 Topics In Classics   3 cr.
29448 AT Mo 02:00 PM-04:25 PM 00116 VICTO     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Bromberg, Jacques 

This course offers a broad cultural and historical survey of rhetorical handbooks from the ancient, late antique, medieval, and early modern periods. It will be useful to students from a variety of fields interested in the intellectual and institutional histories of rhetoric. We will begin with selections from the Sophists, from Plato, Isocrates, Antisthenes, and Aristotle, as well as from Cicero, Seneca, Quintilian, and Tacitus, with particular focus on the formation and development of a rhetorical discipline, the changing contexts for rhetorical performance, and the tension between rhetoric and philosophy. We will then consider late antique pagan rhetoricians (Themistius, Libanius) and Church Fathers (Tertullian, Augustine), with emphasis on the religious dimensions of their early Christian rhetorics and its potential as a tool for interpreting scripture. We will move on to medieval materials (Boethius, Cassiodorus, Isidore of Seville, Bede, Hugh of St. Victor, Aquinas, Petrarch, and Bracciolini), focusing on the enduring influence of the Ciceronian tradition, the place of rhetoric in monastic communities and church education, the Islamic readers of Aristotle’s Rhetoric, and its eventual rediscovery and reception in the Latin (and vernacular) West. We conclude with certain renaissance and early modern rhetorics (Erasmus, Philipp Melanchthon, Peter Ramus), with special attention given to the centrality of rhetoric to investigations of the passions, to early aesthetics, and to the development of civil philosophies (politics, psychology, law, literature). Throughout the term, we will also read and discuss modern treatments of rhetorical theory and of the “deep” history of rhetoric, and survey the major debates in the field. All readings will be accessible in English.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

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