University of Pittsburgh Course Descriptions University of Pittsburgh Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences College of General Studies University Honors College College of Business Administration Swanson School of Engineering Course Descriptions

Key - General Education Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
G Seminar in Composition EX Creative Expression L Foreign Language
W Writing Intensive PH Philosophy COM International/Foreign Culture: Comparative
Q Quantitative and Formal Reasoning SS Social Science GLO International/Foreign Culture: Global
LIT Literature HS Historical Change REG International/Foreign Culture: Regional
MA The Arts NS Natural Sciences IFN International/Foreign Culture: Non-Western
Key - Basic Skills Requirements, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences
I   Workshop in Composition
A  Algebra
Other Keys: Term/Session Codes | Subjects | Special Indicators | Days | Classrooms

HPS Courses 2191

0410 Einstein: Mdrn Sci & Surprises PH    3 cr.
29506 AT MoWe 11:00 AM-11:50 AM 00324 CL     Recitation Required.   Enroll Limit 60 Norton, John D. 

Do astronauts age more slowly? Can a finite universe have no edge? Is time travel possible? Can time have a beginning? Does the moon change because a mouse looks at it? Surprisingly, modern science answers yes to all these questions. This course provides simple-to-understand explanations of these and other related questions, their broader philosophical significance and their histories. The course is suitable for students with no science background but with an interest in the world of modern science.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0427 Myth And Science REG   3 cr.
10742 SE3 We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00332 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ CLASS 0330      Enroll Limit 20 Rampelt, Jason 

Some of the oldest written texts reveal that humans have always told stories to explain the world around them. When those stories are ancient, we call them myths; when they are recent, we call them science. This course will examine primary source texts from ancient Assyrian and Babylonian civilizations through the Greeks to about the 4th century BC. Authors studied will include the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, as well as several authors in astronomy, mathematics, and medicine, including Euclid, Archimedes, and the Hippocratic texts. Key questions addressed: How have concepts of the cosmos changed through the period studied? What is the difference between myth and science? What is the place of divinity in past and present thinking? What roles do history and culture play in conceptions of the natural world?

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0430 Galileo & Creatn Mdrn Science PH  HS    3 cr.
17948 AT TuTh 11:00 AM-12:15 PM 00149 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Palmieri,Paolo 

The Italian physicist and astronomer Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was the decisive figure in the rise of modern science. First, he ushered in a new era in astronomy when he aimed a 30-powered telescope at the sky in 1610. Second, he revolutionized the concept of science when he argued that the book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. Finally, he astounded the theologians, who eventually condemned him to life imprisonment, when he claimed that the scientist's search for the truth cannot be constrained by religious authority. This course will study Galileo in the broader intellectual, social, and religious context of early modern Europe.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0515 Magic, Medicine And Science HS    3 cr.
22949 SE3 Tu 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00205 LAWRN     No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 0089      Enroll Limit 20 Creel, Kathleen 

This course is a partial survey of some important strands in the Western intellectual history. We will start with ancient Greek speculations in cosmology, philosophy, and medicine. Then we will look at some important subsequent developments in these areas and how they were influenced by the Greek tradition. These include, among other topics, the magical tradition that flourished during the Renaissance period. The latter half of the course will focus on the profound intellectual transformations in the 17th century which constitute what we often call The Scientific Revolution. The great scientific achievements of figures such as Descartes, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton will be discussed in detail. Overall, this course is meant to provide a broad picture of some of the most important elements in the Western intellectual tradition and their interactions in history.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0515 Magic, Medicine And Science HS    3 cr.
29513 SE3 We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00144 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ HIST 0089      Enroll Limit 20 Matthiessen, Dana 

Today’s scientific theories and methods are the outgrowth of a historical development dating back to antiquity. In this course we trace the emergence of modern science with an emphasis on the diverse strains of thinking that preceded the scientific era and form its backdrop, from Levantine cosmology and medicine to the magical traditions that blossomed in the Renaissance. The largest share of the course will focus on the years 1500-1700 CE in Europe. We will discuss some celebrated innovators of this period such as Galileo and Newton alongside their lesser-known contemporaries, with the aim to arrive at an understanding of the scientific revolution enriched by historical context.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0611 Princpl Of Scientific Reasning Q    3 cr.
11730 SE3 Mo 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00235 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Ahlstrom, Tyler 

The course will provide students with elementary logic skills and an understanding of scientific arguments. Ours is an increasingly scientific and technical society. In both our personal life decisions and in our work we are daily confronted by scientific results which influence what we do and how we do it. Basic skills in analyzing the structure of arguments in terms of truth and evidence are required to make this type of information accessible and useful. We hear, for example, that drinking alcoholic beverages reduces the chances of heart disease. We might well ask what sorts of tests were done to reach this conclusion and do the tests really justify the claim? We read that certain geographical configurations in South America "prove" that this planet was visited by aliens from outer space. Does this argument differ from other, accepted scientific arguments? This course is designed to aid the student in making sense of a variety of elementary logic skills in conjunction with the application of those skills to actual cases.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

0612 Mind And Medicine   3 cr.
27605 SE3 MoWe 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00130 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Wilkenfeld, Daniel 

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice. Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments. Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function. From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0612 Mind And Medicine   3 cr.
29514 SE3 Tu 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00116 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Wilkenfeld, Daniel 

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice. Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments. Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function. From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0612 Mind And Medicine   3 cr.
22756 AT TuTh 09:30 AM-10:45 AM 00116 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Pence, Evan 

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice. Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments. Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function. From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0612 Mind And Medicine   3 cr.
22879 SE3 Th 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00149 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Wilkenfeld, Daniel 

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice. Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments. Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function. From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

0613 Morality And Medicine PH    3 cr.
11557 AT MoWe 02:00 PM-02:50 PM 00G24 CL     Recitation Required.   Enroll Limit 180 Dietrich, Michael Robert 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0613 Morality And Medicine PH    3 cr.
23432 SE3 Mo 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00130 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 TBA 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0613 Morality And Medicine PH    3 cr.
25056 SE3 Mo 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00142 CL   CGS-Day No recitation.   Enroll Limit 35  

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

Check with the department on how often this course is offered.

0613 Morality And Medicine PH    3 cr.
26105 SE3 Th 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00304 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Borg, George 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0613 Morality And Medicine PH    3 cr.
29516 AT TuTh 01:00 PM-02:15 PM 00304 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Hardalupas, Mahi 

Ethical issues in healthcare and medicine are receiving increasing attention from those within the healthcare profession as well as from ethicists, policy makers and the general public. This course aims to provide an introduction to ethical issues that arise in contemporary medical practice and give students the tools to think clearly about ethical questions. Through class discussions, analyzing texts and writing assignments, we will cover topics such as informed consent; euthanasia; disability and well-being; genetic enhancement; resource allocation; healthcare reform and examine case studies such as the opioid crisis and the treatment of intersex infants. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to issues in medical ethics, will gain insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments (as well as construct their own arguments) and will develop skills that enable them to better engage with ethical questions related to healthcare. No prior experience in medicine and/or ethics (whether in an academic setting or otherwise) will be assumed. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0613 Morality And Medicine PH    3 cr.
29515 AT MoWe 03:00 PM-04:15 PM 00327 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Colaco, David 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies, including cloning and stem cells; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every term.

0621 Prob Solving: How Sci Works Q    3 cr.
23433 AT TuTh 04:00 PM-05:15 PM 00116 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Penn, William 

A scientist announces that the sun contains a new, so far unknown chemical element, even though there is no hope of getting a sample. Another is sure that a famous predecessor has faked his data, even though he has seen nothing but the perfect, published results. Astonishingly, both claims prove to be sober and sound. We will explore the approaches and methods that make such miracles part of the routine of everyday science. This course is intended for students with little or no background in science.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

1616 Artfcl Intelgnc & Phil Of Sci PH    3 cr.
27604 AT TuTh 02:30 PM-03:45 PM 00119 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 30 Allen, Colin 

Could a machine think? Feel? Could it be conscious? This class will explore the relations between minds and machines, investigating some of the philosophical issues raised by artificial intelligence and cognitive science, the scientific disciplines that since the 1950s have sought to understand the nature of mind through comparisons with human-created information processing devices. The course will focus on approaches to naturalizing intentionality (and the nature of intentional actions) and the problem(s) of consciousness. With respect to the latter, we will discuss the recent resurgence of interest in the scientific study of consciousness.

Prerequisite(s): LVL: So, Jr, or Sr

This course is offered infrequently.

1653 Intro To Philosophy Of Science   3 cr.
17373 AT MoWe 01:00 PM-01:50 PM 00232 CL     Recitation Required. Combined w/ PHIL 1610      Enroll Limit 30 Batterman, Robert 

This course will be a survey of some core topics in 20th century Philosophy of Science. Topics to be addressed include: What, if anything, distinguishes science from non-science? Is science a cumulative enterprise that progresses through purely rational means, or is scientific progress a more complicated process? How ought we incorporate new evidence into our evaluation of scientific theories? What does it mean for a scientific theory to be “confirmed or “disconfirmed" by empirical investigation? Should we believe that scientific theories provide a literally true representation of the physical world, or should they be viewed instead as useful tools for calculation with dubious representational capacity? What makes something count as a “scientific theory," anyway? And finally, what is the relationship between scientific investigation, human values, and politics? To what degree, if any, should the latter constrain the former?

Prerequisite(s): LVL: So, Jr, or Sr

This course is offered at least once a year.

1682 Freedom And Determinism PH    3 cr.
30052 SE3 We 06:00 PM-08:30 PM 00363 CL     No recitation. Combined w/ PHIL 1682      Enroll Limit 5 Shumener, Erica 

This course will examine some of the central questions in the free will debate: Is free will compatible with determinism? Does it require the ability to have done otherwise than what we actually did? How are we to understand this ability? Must we be the ultimate sources of our own actions? Is this notion even coherent? If not, where does this leave us? Related questions concerning the topic of moral responsibility will also be explored.

Prerequisite(s): LVL: Jr, So, or Sr

This course is offered every fall and spring.

2497 Teaching Practicum   1 cr.
30710 AT  - 1008-B CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 20 Chirimuuta, Mazviita 

This is a survey course designed specifically for teaching assistants and fellows. The focus will be on practical teaching methods and techniques used in classroom recitations and lectures.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered every fall and spring.

2501 Philosophy Of Science Core Sem   3 cr.
10667 AT We 02:00 PM-04:30 PM 1008-B CL     No recitation. Combined w/ PHIL 2600      Enroll Limit 10 Woodward, James F. 

This course will focus on central topics in philosophy of science, from the era of logical positivism onwards: including explanation, confirmation, theory change, the meaning of theoretical terms, and scientific realism.

Prerequisite(s): PLAN: History and Philosophy of Science (MA, PHD) or Philosophy (PHD)

This course is offered at least once a year.

2504 History of Genetics: Mendel to Methylation   3 cr.
30442 AT We 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 00G28 CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Dietrich, Michael 

In this course we will survey major developments in the history of genetics from Mendel to contemporary research on epigenetics. Drawing upon a mix of primary and secondary sources, we will consider how systems of practice in genetics reflect their wider social contexts, how choices of problems and organisms shaped genetic research programs, how the rise of molecular biology transformed genetics and lead to the genomic era, and how epigenetics has challenged the scope of our understanding of inheritance.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered infrequently.

2505 Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Science   3 cr.
30443 AT Mo 03:00 PM-05:30 PM 1008-B CL       Enroll Limit 15 Allen, Colin F. 

The cognitive sciences began with great enthusiasm for the prospects of a successful multi-disciplinary attack on the mind. This enthusiasm was fueled by the faith that computational ideas could put flesh on abstract notions of mental representation, providing the means to make good physical sense of questions about the nature of mental information processing. The challenges of understanding how minds work have turned out to be much greater than many of the early enthusiasts predicted — in fact they have turned out to be so great that many have argued that we need new paradigms to replace the computationalist-representationalist assumptions of traditional cognitive science. This course aims to provide an understanding of the historical origins of these foundational discussions, and to apply this understanding to a specific topic in the philosophy of cognitive science. For Fall 2018 that topic will be the relevance or irrelevance of Shannon’s information theory to cognitive science.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered infrequently.

2522 Spec Topics-History Of Science   3 cr.
30444 AT We 03:00 PM-05:30 PM 1008-B CL Women in and out of Science   No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Palmieri, Paolo 

This open-platform seminar questions the presence and absence of women in science from antiquity to the twenty-first century. The pedagogy of the seminar is student-centered and promotes intellectual and identity emancipation. Participants are welcome from all academic fields and perspectives, including (but not limited to!) Africana, the history and philosophy of science, philosophy, psychoanalysis, feminism, literature, cultural studies, fine arts, theater, ethnicity and different abilities. We will debate visibility, oppression, objectification, seclusion, the denial of sexuality, violence, institutional racism, and the role of hierarchies in marking disciplinary boundaries… [place holder for participants’s suggestions]. Examples of women in classical science include Virginia Galilei, Maria Gaetana Agnesi, Émilie du Châtelet, Clémence Royer. We will read women scholars who have contributed to women science studies, for instance, Joy Harvey, Banu Subramaniam, Lynn Hankinson Nelson, Justine Larbalestier… [place holder for participants’s suggestions]. Readings, writing and creative projects, punctuated silence, and colorful patterns of resistance are encouraged. Activism and disobedience on diversity, sexual preference, political and linguistic difference, and ethnicity are welcome. There are no prerequisites.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered at least once a year.

2590 Einstein 1905   3 cr.
30783 AT Tu 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 1008-B CL     No recitation.   Enroll Limit 15 Brown, Harvey 

This seminar will involve the study of papers related to (i) the historical orgins of Einstein’s contributions to physics in his annus mirabilis 1905, with special emphasis on his special theory of relativity in the context of discoveries in nineteenth century either theories, and (ii) the origins of his general theory of relativity and its cosmological implications.

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered infrequently.

2626 Topics in Philosphy of Physics   3 cr.
30784 AT Th 09:30 AM-12:00 PM 1008-B CL     No recitation. Combined w/ PHIL 2663      Enroll Limit 15 Brown, Harvey 

This seminar will involve the study of papers related to some or all of the following topics in the philosophy of physics: • recent controversies concerning the nature of explanations in special and general relativity • the role of probability in prominent interpretations of quantum mechanics • the origins of time asymmetry in thermodynamics and the understanding of the arrow of time in statistical mechanics • assorted issues related to symmetry principles in physics, such as Noether’s theorems and the Aharonov-Bohm effects

Prerequisite(s): none

This course is offered infrequently.

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